2012 Chess Olympiad – Round 10

2012 Chess Olympiad – Round 10

Istanbul-2012

For further reports and coverage of the Olympiad, we highly recommend visiting the following websites:

ChessBase News – high quality reports with grandmaster analysis of games.
TWIC – Live updates and thorough results.
Official Standings – Including Board Prizes and Title Norms

Rupert Jones will be continuing his blog on his time at Istanbul – you can see all his posts and more exciting articles, including historical Olympiad encounters at www.fantasychessteam.com.

NEW!! The Fantasy Chess Olympiad team are offering a beautiful wooden chess set courtesy of The Regency Chess Company for the Best Team Name, which will be voted for by YOU! Visit the Fantasy Chess Olympiad website to vote for your favourite team name.

Links to Previous Reports

Preview     Round 1     Round 2     Round 3     Round 4     Round 5     Round 6     Round 7     Round 8     Round 9    

Rupert Jones’ Blog – The PGN Files

Part 1     Part 2     Part 3     Part 4     Part 5     Part 6     Part 7     Part 8     Part 9     Part 10    

IM Christof Sielecki also known as @Chess Explained will be providing excellent daily commentary of the best games of the Olympiad:

Round 1     Round 2     Round 3     Round 4     Round 5     Round 6     Round 7    

Open

Clicking on the match header will reveal the individual board results.

Board 1: China 2½ - 1½ USA


China 2½ – 1½ USA
Wang Hao (2726) ½ – ½ Hikaru Nakamura (2778)
Wang Yue (2685) ½ – ½ Gata Kamsky (2746)
Ding Liren (2695) 1 – 0 Alexander Onischuk (2666)
Bu Xiangzhi (2670) ½ – ½ Varuzhan Akobian (2617)

Board 2: Argentina 1½ - 2½ Russia


Argentina 1½ – 2½ Russia
Fernando Peralta (2606) ½ – ½ Alexander Grischuk (2763)
Diego Flores (2589) 0 – 1 Sergey Karjakin (2785)
Ruben Felgaer (2570) ½ – ½ Evgeny Tomashevsky (2730)
Sandro Mareco (2589) ½ – ½ Dmitry Jakovenko (2722)

Board 3: Netherlands 1 - 3 Armenia

Netherlands 1 – 3 Armenia
Anish Giri (2711) 0 – 1 Levon Aronian (2816)
Loek van Wely (2691) ½ – ½ Sergei Movsesian (2698)
Ivan Sokolov (2698) 0 – 1 Vladimir Akopian (2687)
Jan Smeets (2608) ½ – ½ Gabriel Sargissian (2693)

Board 4: Azerbaijan 1½ - 2½ Ukraine

Azerbaijan 1½ – 2½ Ukraine
Teimour Radjabov (2788) ½ – ½ Vasily Ivanchuk (2769)
Eltaj Safarli (2620) 0 – 1 Ruslan Ponomariov (2734)
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (2729) ½ – ½ Andriy Volokitin (2709)
Rauf Mamedov (2634) ½ – ½ Alexander Moiseenko (2706)

Board 5: Czech Republic 1 - 3 Poland

Czech Republic 1 – 3 Poland
Viktor Laznicka (2683) 0 – 1 Radoslaw Wojtaszek (2717)
David Navara (2691) 1 – 0 Bartosz Socko (2635)
Zbynek Hracek (2619) 0 – 1 Dariusz Swiercz (2594)
Vlastimil Babula (2595) 0 – 1 Bartlomiej Macieja (2594)

Board 6: Denmark 0 - 4 Hungary

Denmark 0 – 4 Hungary
Lars Schandorff (2516) 0 – 1 Peter Leko (2737)
Jacob Aagaard (2517) 0 – 1 Zoltan Almasi (2713)
Allan Stig Rasmussen (2496) 0 – 1 Judit Polgar (2698)
Jakob Van Glud (2498) 0 – 1 Ferenc Berkes (2685)

Board 7: Belarus 1½ - 2½ Germany

Belarus 1½ – 2½ Germany
Sergei Zhigalko (2667) ½ – ½ Arkadij Naiditsch (2712)
Andrey Zhigalko (2582) ½ – ½ Georg Meier (2648)
Vitaly Teterev (2528) ½ – ½ Daniel Fridman (2653)
Kirill Stupak (2523) 0 – 1 Jan Gustafsson (2610)

Board 8: Philippines 2 - 2 Vietnam

Philippines 2 – 2 Vietnam
Wesley So (2652) ½ – ½ Le Quang Liem (2693)
Oliver Barbosa (2554) ½ – ½ Nguyen Ngoc Truong Son (2639)
Eugene Torre (2469) ½ – ½ Nguyen Van Huy (2506)
Mark Paragua (2508) ½ – ½ Nguyen Doc Hoa (2505)

After yesterday’s exciting day, the new leaders China took on the Russian conquerors, the USA. Every game board will count as the title is now likely to be decided by tiebreak. Board 4 was quickly drawn as a dead drawn bishops of opposite-colour endgame was reached. Wang Hao (2726) pressed against Hikaru Nakamura (2778) in an endgame but the American ultimately held it fairly comfortably. The middle two boards continued past time control, but both looked quite drawish. However the live cameras were unfortunately focused on Alexander Onischuk (2666) as he was shaking his head in disbelief in misplaying a rook and pawn endgame that he should have defended quite comfortably. Ding Liren (2695) was the lucky recipient and when Wang Yue (2685) shut up shop on Board 2, Onischuk will be left to rue his error as the USA undid all their efforts from yesterday, while China are now within touching distance of the Gold medal courtesy of their 2½-1½ win.

Russia have not given up hope on winning the Gold medal and they would be looking for a decent win today against Argentina. Sergey Karjakin (2785) followed the brief as he won quickly against Diego Flores (2589) while Fernando Peralta (2606) seemed content to liquidate to a draw with White against Alexander Grischuk (2763). When the board 3 encounter was also drawn, Russia had to rely on Dmitry Jakovenko (2722) to draw against Sandro Mareco (2589), but he had misplayed the middlegame and was facing two strong passed pawns as he was a pawn down in a rook and bishop of opposite colour ending. However the experience Russian navigated his way into a drawn rook and pawn ending to give Russia a great chance of winning the Gold medal on Sunday.

Levon Aronian (2816) gave young-gun Anish Giri (2711) a rough lesson in what to expect at the elite level as he outplayed the Dutchman in the late middlegame to give Armenia a 1-0 lead over the Netherlands, which they would never surrender. On board 3 in that match, Vladimir Akopian (2687) won an unusual game in which he sacrificed a piece for three pawns and liquidated into an endgame where the extra pawns proved to be way too strong for the extra piece. Armenia still have a chance of winning the Gold medal but will likely have to beat China and hope Russia fail to win as their tiebreak is much inferior to their two rivals.

Ruslan Ponomariov (2734) outclassed Eltaj Safarli (2620) in the only decisive game as Ukraine ended Azerbaijan’s hopes of winning a medal. Uzbekistan pulled off a fine scalp in defeating Bulgaria, largely thanks to former World Champion Rustam Kasimdzhanov (2684) annihilating Veselin Topalov (2752) in just 23 moves. There were also wins for Poland, Hungary, Germany and Israel while the matches between Philippines and Vietnam, and India and Cuba were drawn.

Open Home Nations

Clicking on the match header will reveal the individual board results.

Board 17: England 4 - 0 Uruguay

England 4 – 0 Uruguay
Michael Adams (2722) 1 – 0 Andres Rodriguez (2536)
Gawain Jones (2653) 1 – 0 Martin Crosa (2344)
David Howell (2635) 1 – 0 Bernardo Roselli (2420)
Nicholas Pert (2555) 1 – 0 Nicolas Ulaneo (2181)

Board 43: Sri Lanka 1 - 3 Scotland

Sri Lanka 1 – 3 Scotland
Dulan Edirisinghe (2046) 0 – 1 Colin McNab (2446)
Withanage Perera (2110) ½ – ½ Ketevan Arakhamia-Grant (2421)
Isuru Dhananjaya Alahakoon (2060) 0 – 1 John Shaw (2424)
Patthini Kapuge Jaysundara (2027) ½ – ½ Graham Morrison (2360)

Board 46: Wales 1½ - 2½ Ireland

Wales 1½ – 2½ Ireland
Richard Jones (2393) ½ – ½ Sam Collins (2459)
Tim Kett (2237) 0 – 1 Alex Astaneh Lopez (2398)
Richard Dineley (2259) ½ – ½ Ryan Rhys Griffiths (2362)
Thomas Brown (2104) ½ – ½ Daire McMahon (2153)

Board 72: Sierra Leone 0 - 4 Jersey

Sierra Leone 0 – 4 Jersey
Ansumana Kamara (2086) 0 – 1 Alan Rosenbeiger (2151)
Winston GM Thomas (1907) 0 – 1 Louis Jouhault (1966)
Ronald Lwebuga (N/A) 0 – 1 Paul Wojciechowski (2068)
Brian A Cole (N/A) 0 – 1 Graham Mooney (1938)

Board 73: Bermuda 1½ - 2½ Guernsey

Bermuda 1½ – 2½ Guernsey
Clevert Bacchas (1944) 0 – 1 Fred Hamperl (2120)
James Dill (1923) ½ – ½ Peter Kirby (2007)
Gary Cooper (1893) 0 – 1 Peter Rowe (1987)
Michael Radford (1848) 1 – 0 Toby Brookfield (1823)

England were looking to restore some pride in the final two rounds as they took on Uruguay. Gawain Jones (2653) got England off to a winning start as he took advantage of his opponent’s passive opening play and took advantage of a centralised king and exposed queen. David Howell (2635) put England 2-0 inside 2½ hours when his opponent trapped his own bishop. Even Michael Adams (2722) was in hack-attack mode today as England looked to get rid of some of their frustration on their poor opponents and won 4-0 in double quick time.

Today saw the first Home Nations derby of the entire Olympiad as Wales faced Ireland. Ireland went into the match as heavy rating favourites but this wasn’t going to deter the Welsh from having a go. All the games were hard-fought and unclear. The bottom two boards were both drawn, but I think Richard Dineley (2259) will be glad of tomorrow’s rest day as he might need a couple of stiff drinks if he puts his game through the computer, he missed a tactical shot to give Wales the lead. Sam Collins (2459) was trying to win with an extra pawn in a rook and pawn ending against Richard Jones (2393) but the Welsman’s defence stood firm. However Ireland’s rating advantage finally told as Alex Astaneh Lopez (2398) managed to win an extremely complicated queen and minor piece endgame to give Ireland a narrow 2½-1½ victory.

Scotland overwhelmed Sri Lanka 3-1. Jersey had a win by default to get them going immediately against Sierra Leone as Graham Mooney (1938) received an unexpected day off. The rest of the squad quickly joined him as they earned a whitewash. Guernsey joined Jersey in the winner’s circle as they scored a fine 2½-1½ win over Bermuda.

Titles: Chris Ross (IBCA) and Paul Wojciechowski (Jersey) have earned the Candidate Master (CM) title as they have scored greater than 50% having playing 7 or more games. Congratulations to them.

Open Standings

Rank Country Match Points Deducted SB
1 China 17 343.5
3 Armenia 17 336.5
3 Russia 17 321.5
4 Ukraine 16 292.5
5 Hungary 15 311.5
6 USA 15 307
7 Germany 15 282
8 Poland 15 259
23 England 13 252
65 Scotland 11 171.5
70 Ireland 10 203
115 Wales 8 106.5
136 Jersey 7 75
137 Guernsey 7 65

Full Round 10 Standings

Women

Clicking on the match header will reveal the individual board results.

Board 1: China 2 - 2 Kazakhstan

China 2 – 2 Kazakhstan
Hou Yifan (2599) ½ – ½ Guliskhan Nakhbayeva (2291)
Zhao Xue (2549) 1 – 0 Gulmira Dauletova (2267)
Ju Wenjun (2528) ½ – ½ Dinara Saduakassova (2216)
Ding Yixin (2424) 0 – 1 Madina Davletbayeva (2165)

Board 2: Armenia ½ - 3½ Russia

Armenia ½ – 3½ Russia
Elina Danielan (2476) 0 – 1 Tatiana Kosintseva (2530)
Lilit Mkrtchian (2454) 0 – 1 Valentina Gunina (2507)
Lilit Galojan (2349) ½ – ½ Nadezhda Kosintseva (2524)
Maria Kursova (2338) 0 – 1 Natalia Pogonina (2448)

Board 3: Ukraine 2½ - 1½ Poland

Ukraine 2½ – 1½ Poland
Kateryna Lahno (2542) ½ – ½ Monika Socko (2467)
Natalia Zhukova (2442) 1 – 0 Iweta Rajlich (2412)
Anna Ushenina (2433) ½ – ½ Jolanta Zawadzka (2377)
Inna Yanovska (2404) ½ – ½ Karina Szczepkowska (2375)

Board 4: Azerbaijan 1½ - 2½ France

Azerbaijan 1½ – 2½ France
Zeynab Mamedyarova (2285) 0 – 1 Almira Skripchenko (2442)
Gular Mamadova (2324) 1 – 0 Nino Maisuradze (2284)
Turkan Mamedyarova (2285) ½ – ½ Silvia Collas (2261)
Nargiz Umudova (2208) 0 – 1 Andreea Bollengier (2253)

Board 5: India 3½ - ½ Israel

India 3½ – ½ Israel
Harika Dronavalli (2503) 1 – 0 Maya Porat (2295)
Tania Sachdev (2379) 1 – 0 Marsel Efroimski (2174)
Mary Ann Gomes (2396) ½ – ½ Masha Klinova (2317)
Swaminathan Soumya (2271) 1 – 0 Yuliya Shvayger (2202)

Board 6: Germany 3 - 1 Spain

Germany 3 – 1 Spain
Elisabeth Paehtz (2483) 1 – 0 Ana Matnadze (2422)
Tetyana Melamed (2356) ½ – ½ Olga Alexandrova (2417)
Melanie Ohme (2337) ½ – ½ Sabrina Vega Gutierrez (2355)
Marta Michna (2380) 1 – 0 Monica Calzetta Ruiz (2276)

In the Women’s competition, China had a one point lead over nearest rivals Russia. China had a simple match on paper as they faced Kazakhstan. However from the outset it was clear that Kazakhstan weren’t intimated by their vastly higher-rated opponents. This was especially true when Ding Yixin (2424) trapped her own rook in the middle of the board and Madina Davletbayeva (2165) had an extra exchange to complement here already superior position. Althought Ding kept fighting, the Kazakh eventually batted away all resistance to give Kazakhstan a very unlikely lead. Ju Wenjun (2528) never quite had enough advantage to get past Dinara Saduakassova‘s (2216) defences and when Zhao Xue (2549) eventually sealed her win, all the pressure was put on Hou Yifan’s (2599) as she tried to win a level knight endgame against Guliskhan Nakhbayeva (2291). Hou has defeated 2500+ players in level positions before, but on this occasion, the complications she set did not faze her unheralded opponent and a draw was agreed on move 53. China could only draw with Kazakhstan who they outrated by nearly 300 points per board, a shock result that brought Russia back into the race for the Gold medal.

On paper, Russia had a tricky match against Armenia. The Russian girls stepped up to the plate and Armenia left their chess brains at home, as a combination of blunders and generally poor play meant Russia’s victorious scoreline of 3½-½ was not flattering in any way. This heavy win improved Russia’s tiebreak, but not enough to overtake China. They will have to win big on Sunday and hope for another slip-up from China.

There were wins for Ukraine, France, India, Germany and Bulgaria whilst USA’s miserable tournament continued as they could only draw with Mongolia.

Women Home Nations

Clicking on the match header will reveal the individual board results.

Board 23: Canada 2 - 2 England

Canada 2 – 2 England
Natalia Khoudgarian (2158) 0 – 1 Anya Corke (2254)
Yelizaveta Orlova (1947) ½ – ½ Maria Yurenok (2058)
Alexandra Botez (2009) 1 – 0 Sabrina Chevannes (2090)
Iulia Lacau-Rodean (1999) ½ – ½ Kanwal Bhatia (2103)

Board 29: Norway 3½ - ½ Scotland

Norway 3½ – ½ Scotland
Silje Bjerke (2235) 1 – 0 Ali Roy (1836)
Ellen Hagesaether (2230) ½ – ½ Rosemary Giulian (1894)
Sheila Barth Sahl (2235) 1 – 0 Joy Durno (1863)
Torill Skytte (1954) 1 – 0 Alice Lampard (1593)

Board 30: Moldova 4 - 0 Wales

Moldova 4 – 0 Wales
Svetlana Petrenko (2199) 1 – 0 Olivia Smith (2022)
Diana Baciu (2186) 1 – 0 Susan Blackburn (1967)
Karolina Smokina (2156) 1 – 0 Lynda Roberts (1914)
Elena Partac (2102) 1 – 0 Sandra Blackburn (N/A)

Board 33: Bangladesh 3 - 1 Ireland

Bangladesh 3 – 1 Ireland
Sultana Sharmin Shirin (2002) 1 – 0 Hannah Lowry O’Reilly (1818)
Rani Hamid (1952) 1 – 0 Gearoidin O’Liaghleis (1894)
Sultana Zakia (1987) 0 – 1 Karina Kruk (N/A)
Nazrana Khan (2008) 1 – 0 Sarah Jane Hearne (1565)

England were in for an interesting match against Canada, who they slightly outrated. Like so many of the Women’s matches, all the games went beyond move 40. The games on Boards 2 and 4 were pretty blocked and draws were unsurprising results. Sabrina Chevannes (2090) was involved in a double-edged encounter against Alexandra Botez (2009). Initially Chevannes seemed to have the attack but Botez’s counter-attack came thick and fast and Chevannes felt the need to go into an inferior rook endgame to defend against the Canadian’s threats. This was a good practical decision, but unfortunately this endgame broke the rule that all rook and pawn endgames are drawn, as this one was always winning for the Canadian and she played well to secure the full point. Anya Corke (2254) has really shone in the second half of this tournament and when she won a pawn in the middlegame, she never let her opponent breathe and even in the resulting bishops of opposite colour ending, she played with great calm and control to ensure that England got something from the match with a 2-2 draw.

Scotland, Wales and Ireland were always up against it as they were playing much higher-rated opposition, but for the most part all the women put up stiff resistance as their teams all fell to defeats.

Titles: Monika Gedvilaite and Karina Kruk (both Ireland), Alice Lampard and Heather Lang (both Scotland) and Lynda Roberts (Wales) have earned the Women Candidate Master (WCM) title as they have scored greater than 50% having playing 7 or more games. Congratulations to them.

Women Standings

Rank Country Match Points Deducted SB
1 China 17 357
2 Russia 17 348
3 Ukraine 16 325
4 France 15 294
5 Kazakhstan 15 281
6 Germany 15 277.5
7 India 15 277.5
45 England 11 187
83 Ireland 9 123.5
84 Wales 9 122.5
85 Scotland 9 119.5

Full Round 10 Standings


Features editor for the Yorkshire Chess website. I collate and write atricles about all the latest chess activities in Yorkshire and beyond. I've also been known to shove some pieces myself from time to time!

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