2012 Chess Olympiad – Round 5

2012 Chess Olympiad – Round 5

Istanbul-2012

For further reports and coverage of the Olympiad, we highly recommend visiting the following websites:

ChessBase News – high quality reports with grandmaster analysis of games.
TWIC – Live updates and thorough results

Rupert Jones will be continuing his blog on his time at Istanbul – you can see all his posts and more exciting articles, including historical Olympiad encounters at www.fantasychessteam.com.

Links to Previous Reports

Preview     Round 1     Round 2     Round 3     Round 4    

Rupert Jones’ Blog – The PGN Files

Part 1     Part 2     Part 3     Part 4     Part 5     Part 6     Part 7    

IM Christof Sielecki also known as @Chess Explained will be providing excellent daily commentary of the best games of the Olympiad:

Round 1     Round 2     Round 3     Round 4     Round 5    

Open

Clicking on the match header will reveal the individual board results.

Board 1: Armenia 2½ - 1½ Ukraine


Armenia 2½ – 1½ Ukraine
Levon Aronian (2816) 1 – 0 Vasily Ivanchuk (2769)
Sergei Movsesian (2698) ½ – ½ Ruslan Ponomariov (2734)
Vladimir Akopian (2687) ½ – ½ Andriy Volokitin (2709)
Gabriel Sargissian (2693) ½ – ½ Pavel Eljanov (2693)

Board 2: Hungary 1½ - 2½ Russia


Hungary 1½ – 2½ Russia
Peter Leko (2737) ½ – ½ Vladimir Kramnik (2797)
Zoltan Almasi (2713) 0 – 1 Alexander Grischuk (2763)
Judit Polgar (2698) ½ – ½ Sergey Karjakin (2785)
Csaba Balogh (2668) ½ – ½ Evgeny Tomashevsky (2730)

Board 3: Germany 2 - 2 Montenegro

Germany 2 – 2 Montenegro
Arkadij Naiditsch (2712) 0 – 1 Nikola Djukic (2523)
Georg Meier (2648) ½ – ½ Dragisa Blagojevic (2510)
Daniel Fridman (2653) 1 – 0 Milan Drasko (2479)
Jan Gustafsson (2610) ½ – ½ Dragan Kosic (2526)

Board 4: Croatia 2½ - 1½ France

Croatia 2½ – 1½ France
Ivan Saric (2638) ½ – ½ Maxime Vachier-Lagrave (2686)
Hrvoje Stevic (2614) ½ – ½ Romain Eduoard (2652)
Ante Brkic (2587) ½ – ½ Vladislav Tkachiev (2644)
Zdenko Kozul (2616) 1 – 0 Christian Bauer (2682)

Board 5: USA 2 - 2 Czech Republic

USA 2 – 2 Czech Republic
Hikaru Nakamura (2778) ½ – ½ Viktor Laznicka (2683)
Gata Kamsky (2746) ½ – ½ David Navara (2691)
Alexander Onischuk (2666) ½ – ½ Zbynek Hracek (2619)
Ray Robson (2598) ½ – ½ Vlastimil Babula (2595)

Board 6: Canada ½ - 3½ Azerbaijan

Canada ½ – 3½ Azerbaijan
Bator Sambuev (2523) 0 – 1 Teimour Radjabov (2788)
Leonid Gerzhoy (2448) 0 – 1 Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (2729)
Nikolay Oritsyn (2472) 0 – 1 Rauf Mamedov (2634)
Eric Hansen (2472) ½ – ½ Gadir Guseynov (2613)

Board 7: India 2 - 2 England

India 2 – 2 England
Krishnan Sasikiran (2707) ½ – ½ Michael Adams (2722)
Pentala Harikrishna (2685) ½ – ½ Gawain Jones (2653)
Parimarjan Negi (2664) ½ – ½ Nigel Short (2698)
Abhijeet Gupta (2637) ½ – ½ Nicholas Pert (2555)

Board 8: Poland 2½ - 1½ Argentina

Poland 2½ – 1½ Argentina
Radoslaw Wojtaszek (2717) ½ – ½ Fernando Peralta (2606)
Bartosz Socko (2635) ½ – ½ Diego Flores (2589)
Dariusz Swiercz (2594) ½ – ½ Ruben Felgaer (2570)
Bartlomiej Macieja (2594) 1 – 0 Sandro Mareco (2589)

Board 9: China 3½ - ½ Iran

China 3½ – ½ Iran
Wang Hao (2726) 1 – 0 Ehsan Ghaem-Maghami (2579)
Ding Liren (2695) 1 – 0 Pouria Darini (2503)
Bu Xiangzhi (2670) ½ – ½ Pouya Idani (2477)
Li Chao (2665) 1 – 0 Asghar Golizadeh (2472)

Today’s blockbuster match was found on top board with Armenia facing off against defending champions Ukraine. Levon Aronian (2816) thrives in imbalnced tactical positions and this is exactly what he had against Vasily Ivanchuk (2769). After lots of tactics and exchanges, Aronian emerged an exchange up with a safer king and it wasn’t long before the Ukranian resigned to give Armenia a 1-0 lead. Things weren’t getting any better as Boards 2 and 3 were looking very drawish and although there was some life in the game on Board 4, it was the Armenian who seemed to be having most of the fun. As it turned out the Board 4 encounter between Gabriel Sargissian (2693) and Pavel Eljanov (2693) was the first of these games to finish as a draw. As much as Ukraine tried, they could not find a win on the middle two boards so Armenia moved to 10/10 match points going into the first rest day.

Board 2 saw the remaining teams on 100% match points facing off as Russia took on Hungary. Top board was a rematch of the 2004 World Championship. Peter Leko (2737) seemed to be pressuring Vladimir Kramnik (2797) out of the opening but could not find a way to utilise his space advantage and the players agreed to a draw on move 31. Then right around the time control came a flurry of activity. Boards 3 and 4 had looked drawn for some time and were agreed drawn while Alexander Grischuk (2763) and Zoltan Almasi (2713) were involved in a time scramble. As is so often the case, Grischuk is superb with the complications in time trouble. Almasi was unable to defend accurately and Russia’s perfect start to the competition continued as they won 2½-1½.

Germany outrated surprise package Montenegro by an average of about 150 points per board and it looked like the win would be routine after Daniel Fridman (2653) put Germany in a 1½-1½ lead. However Arkadij Naiditsch (2712) played too optimistically against Nikola Djukic (2523) and was punished as the Montenegran calmly defended against the attack and turned the tables to give Montenegro a surprise equaliser. Germany had to rely on Georg Meier (2648) to win a rook ending with an extra pawn against Dragisa Blagojevic (2510). Unfortunately for the European Champions, Blagojevic held on to give the Montenegrians a surprise 2-2 draw.

England were looking to continue their fine start against India. Michael Adams (2722) got a solid draw with the black pieces against Krishnan Sasikiran (2707) while Nick Pert (2555) overcame a significant rating deficit to hold Abhijeet Gupta (2637) to a comfortable draw. However England were in rook endings a pawn down on the two middle boards and were fighting to get a draw from the match. In the end, both Gawain Jones (2653) and Nigel Short (2698) completed their tasks and England will be relieved and quite pleased to come away with a 2-2 draw.

China took advantage of a heavy rating advantage to beat Iran 3½ – ½ while Azerbaijan overcame stiff resistance from Canada to win by the same scoreline

Some of the teams seemed to want more time to prepare for tonight’s Bermuda Party as all four boards of USA vs Czech Republic and the top two boards of Croatia vs France were all drawn by repetition around the obligatory 30 move mark. Croatia managed to win their match thanks to a win by Zdenko Kozul (2616) on Board 4. The match between Poland and Argentina was drawn on the top three boards but Bartolmiej Macieja (2594) achieved the decisive win as his opponent forgot to give his knight an escape square.

Open Home Nations

Clicking on the match header will reveal the individual board results.

Board 12: Ireland 1½ - 2½ Israel

Ireland 1½ – 2½ Israel
Sam Collins (2459) 0 – 1 Emil Sutovsky (2687)
Alex Astaneh Lopez (2398) 1 – 0 Maxim Rodshtein (2642)
Ryan Rhys Griffiths (2362) 0 – 1 Evgeny Postny (2638)
Gavin Wall (2338) ½ – ½ Boris Avrukh (2605)

Board 54: Dominican Republic 1½ - 2½ Scotland

Dominican Republic 1½ – 2½ Scotland
Jose Lisandro Munoz Santana (2428) 1 – 0 Colin McNab (2446)
William Puntier (2312) 0 – 1 Ketevan Arakhamia-Grant (2421)
Luis Maria Flaquer (2297) ½ – ½ John Shaw (2424)
Francis Fernandez (2289) 0 – 1 Graham Morrison (2360)

Board 63: Guernsey 1 - 3 Ethiopia

Guernsey 1 – 3 Ethiopia
Peter Kirby (2007) ½ – ½ Desalegn Fekadu Jimma (2149)
Peter Rowe (1987) ½ – ½ Estube Haileselassie Tadese (N/A)
Toby Brookfield (1823) 0 – 1 Girum Teklewold Altaye (N/A)
Timothy Knight (1821) 0 – 1 Bizuayeh Haile (N/A)

Board 69: Wales 3 - 1 Honduras

Wales 3 – 1 Honduras
Richard Jones (2393) 1 – 0 Alcides Ivan Meza Martinez (2187)
Tim Kett (2237) ½ – ½ Sergio Huguet Mainar (2094)
Richard Dineley (2259) ½ – ½ Yelso Bobadilla (1874)
Iolo Jones (2243) 1 – 0 Elvis Hernandez Reyes (N/A)

Board 72: Jersey 2 - 2 Mauritania

Jersey 2 – 2 Mauritania
Tito Khan (2049)) 1 – 0 Mohamed Heiba (1903)
Louis Jouhault (1966) 0 – 1 Sidi Mbarcek Mohamed (1947)
Paul Wojciechowski (2068) 1 – 0 Ahmed Taleb Mohamed (1965)
Graham Mooney (1938) 0 – 1 Sidi Boydia (2024)

Ireland were rewarded for their good performances so far with a tie against defending Bronze medallists, Israel. The Irish players put up some stiff resistance, but the first two results went decisively for Israel as Emil Sutovsky (2687) and Evgeny Postny (2638) gave Israel a 2-0 lead. However the next result would leave the Israelis biting their nails as Alex Astaneh Lopez (2398) beat Maxim Rodshtein (2642) with the Black pieces in a game where Alex was in control of all the way through, a really superb victory. However Gavin Wall (2338) could not quite pull off a miracle but still came away with an excellent draw against Boris Avrukh (2605). Ireland can be very proud of their performance in the first half of this year’s Olympiad.

Scotland would have been looking for a strong performance against the Dominican Republic. However Jose Lisandro Munoz Santana (2428) dented these ambitions as he wiped out Colin McNab (2446) after a brutal 150 attack left McNab’s king stranded in the centre. The Scots don’t admit defeat easily. Ketevan Arakhamia-Grant (2421) and Graham Morrison (2360) hit back for the Scots as they pressured their opponents until they crumbled. John Shaw (2424) held his pawn-down endgame to give Scotland a very pleasing victory going into the rest day.

Wales had a comfortable 3-1 win over the lower-rated Honduras. Guernsey were outplayed by the unknown quantity of Ethiopia while Jersey are still looking for their first match win as they could only draw against Mauritania.

Rupert Jones (1941) got off the mark as Papua New Guinea completed a 4-0 win over Burundi. Chris Ross moved to 3/3 for the IBCA against New Zealand.

Open Standings

Rank Country Match Points Deducted SB
1 Armenia 10 84
2 Russia 10 77
3 Azerbaijan 9 74
4 Croatia 9 61.5
5 China 8 77
6 Ukraine 8 77
7 Germany 8 75.5
8 India 8 74
9 USA 8 73.5
10 Hungary 8 71.5
13 England 8 65.5
41 Ireland 6 56.5
88 Scotland 5 29.5
115 Wales 4 12
136 Guernsey 2 16.5
148 Jersey 2 7.5

Full Round 5 Standings

Women

Clicking on the match header will reveal the individual board results.

Board 1: Russia 2½ - 1½ France

Russia 2½ – 1½ France
Tatiana Kosintseva (2530) ½ – ½ Almira Skripchenko (2442)
Valentina Gunina (2507) 0 – 1 Sophie Millet (2411)
Nadezhda Kosintseva (2524) 1 – 0 Nino Maisuradze (2284)
Alexandra Kosteniuk (2489) 1 – 0 Andreea Bollengier (2253)

Board 2: Serbia 2½ - 1½ Bulgaria

Serbia 2½ – 1½ Bulgaria
Natasa Bojkovic (2392) ½ – ½ Antonaneta Stefanova (2502)
Maria Manakova (2304) 1 – 0 Iva Videnova (2317)
Andjelija Stojanovic (2277) 0 – 1 Margarita Voiska (2281)
Ana Benderac (2266) 1 – 0 Elitsa Raeva (2313)

Board 3: Greece 1½ - 2½ Poland

Greece 1½ – 2½ Poland
Yelena Dembo (2457) ½ – ½ Monika Socko (2467)
Anna-Maria Botsari (2336) ½ – ½ Iweta Rajlich (2412)
Marina Makropoulou (2256) 0 – 1 Jolanta Zawadzka (2377)
Ekaterini Pavlidou (2237) ½ – ½ Karina Szczepkowska (2375)

Board 4: Georgia 2 - 2 Ukraine

Georgia 2 – 2 Ukraine
Nana Dzagnidze (2547) ½ – ½ Kateryna Lahno (2542)
Bela Khotenashvili (2500) ½ – ½ Maria Muzychuk (2466)
Lela Javakhishvili (2449) ½ – ½ Anna Ushenina (2433)
Nino Khurtsidze (2456) ½ – ½ Inna Yanovska (2404)

Board 5: Latvia 1½ - 2½ Slovakia

Latvia 1½ – 2½ Slovakia
Dana Reizniece-Ozola (2251) ½ – ½ Zuzana Borosova (2280)
Laura Rogule (2315) ½ – ½ Regina Pokorna (2353)
Ilze Berzina (2306) ½ – ½ Julia Kochetkova (2305)
Inguna Erneste (2203) 0 – 1 Veronika Machalova (2222)

Board 6: China 3½ - ½ India

China 3½ – ½ India
Hou Yifan (2599) ½ – ½ Harika Dronavalli (2503)
Zhao Xue (2549) 1 – 0 Sanjay Eesha Karavade (2371)
Ju Wenjun (2528) 1 – 0 Tania Sachdev (2379)
Huang Qian (2447) 1 – 0 Mary Ann Gomes (2396)

Board 7: Moldova ½ - 3½ Hungary

Moldova ½ – 3½ Hungary
Diana Baciu (2186) ½ – ½ Hoang Thanh Trang (2464)
Karolina Smokina (2156) 0 – 1 Ticia Gara (2385)
Elena Partac (2102) 0 – 1 Anna Rudolf (2289)
Olga Hincu (1931) 0 – 1 Petra Papp (2302)

Board 8: Vietnam 3 - 1 USA

Vietnam 3 – 1 USA
Le Thao Nguyen Pham (2393) 1 – 0 Anna Zatonskih (2512)
Thi Mai Hung Nguyen (2212) 0 – 1 Irina Krush (2467)
Kieu Thien Kim Le (2226) 1 – 0 Sabina Foisor (2356)
Bich Ngoc Pham (2172) 1 – 0 Tatev Ambrahamyan (2303)

The women’s tournament saw the only teams on 8/8 match points lock horns as defending champions Russia faced France. Almira Skripchenko (2442) utilised the Scandinavian defence to earn a comfortable draw with black against Tatiana Kosintseva (2530). However Russia’s strength in depth told on the lower boards. Nadezhda Kosintseva (2524) caught her opponent napping and quickly found a way to enter a winning queen and pawn ending to give Russia their first win. Meanwhile former World Champion Alexandra Kosteniuk (2489) was slowly torturing her opponent with a strong knight and bishop against rook and pawn and ultimately her opponent got her rooks caught in a tangle and was forced to give back an exchange, so she resigned to give Russia an unassailable lead.

The match on Board 2 between Bulgaria and Serbia made for fascinating viewing as the outcome of the match was never clear. Natasa Bojkovic (2392) held Antonaneta Stefanova (2502) to a draw in an interesting encounter. The two key games of this match took place on Boards 2 and 4. Serbia were pressing in both of these with the Black pieces, but their tasks were made much easier as their Bulgarian opponents blundered meaning that Maria Manakova’s (2304) Ana Benderac’s (2266) tasks became much easier as they guided Serbia to a 2½-1½.

There was disappointment for Greece and they missed an opportunity to steal a point from Poland. Yelena Dembo (2457) had won an exchange against Monika Socko (2467) but could not find a way throught the Pole’s defences and could only draw the game after having serious winning chances. The board 3 encounter between Marina Makropoulou (2256)
and Jolanta Zawadzka (2377) looked to be heading for a dead draw, however Makropoulou started to needlessly play passively and then just voluntarily put herself in a pin that proved immediately decisive in the Pole’s favour. The other two boards were drawn, meaning that Poland could breath a big sigh of relief at having scarped through with a 2½-1½ victory.

China enjoyed a comfortable victory over India while Hungary massively outrated Moldova and duly won 3½-½. Vietnam pulled off a shock win over the USA as America’s strongest side were well beaten. Le Thao Nguyen Pham (2393) and Kieu Thien Kim Le (2226) made Anna Zatonskih (2512) and Sabina Foisor (2356) look very ordinary and Bich Ngoc Pham (2172) put the icing on the cake with a third victory as Tatev Ambrahamyan (2303) was desperately trying to win to draw the match for the USA.

Women Home Nations

Clicking on the match header will reveal the individual board results.

Board 23: England 1½ - 2½ Armenia

England 1½ – 2½ Armenia
Anya Corke (2254) 0 – 1 Elina Danielan (2476)
Sarah Hegarty (2120) 0 – 1 Lilit Mkrtchian (2454)
Sabrina Chevannes (2090) ½ – ½ Maria Kursova (2338)
Kanwal Bhatia (2103) 1 – 0 Anna Hairapetian (2203)

Board 28: Italy 3½ - ½ Wales

Italy 3½ – ½ Wales
Elena Sedina (2338) ½ – ½ Olivia Smith (2022)
Olga Zimina (2327) 1 – 0 Susan Blackburn (1967)
Marina Brunello (2239) 1 – 0 Lynda Roberts (1914)
Mariagrazia De Rosa (2087) 1 – 0 Sandra Blackburn (N/A)

Board 36: Mexico 3 - 1 Scotland

Mexico 3 – 1 Scotland
Ivette Alejandra Garcia Morales (2014) 1 – 0 Heather Lang (2015)
Alejandra Guerrero Rodriguez (2072) 1 – 0 Ali Roy (1836)
Lorena Alejandra Mendoza Velazquez (1993) ½ – ½ Rosemary Giulian (1894)
Janet Sarai Vazquez Flores (1937) ½ – ½ Joy Durno (1863)

Board 47: Yemen 2 - 2 Ireland

Yemen 2 – 2 Ireland
Amany Zewar (1689) 0 – 1 Monika Gedvilaite (1985)
Amal Abdullah (1753) 1 – 0 Hannah Lowry O’Reilly (1818)
Mada Al-Sharif (1740) 1 – 0 Gearoidin O’Liaghleis (1894)
Omaima Salah (1675) 0 – 1 Karina Kruk (N/A)

England were in for a tough match against Armenia and they did not get off to a good start as Anya Corke (2254) got steamrollered by Elina Danielan (2476) in 18 moves. Sabrina Chevannes (2090) was never worse in her draw with Maria Kursova (2338). Lilit Mkrtchian (2454) finally sealed her inevitable win to give Armenia the match victory. In the final game to finish, Kanwal Bhatia (2103) played accurately and precisely to defeat her higher-rated opponent and give England a more than respectable scoreline of 1½-2½. Hopefully England will take their form of the last couple of rounds into the second half.

Scotland’s match with Mexico was very eventful and could have finished with any of three results. Heather Lang (2015) was made to pay for her risky approach against Ivette Alejandra Garcia Morales (2014) to put Scotland in a 1-0 deficit. Ali Roy (1836) seemed to be holding her rook ending a pawn down against Alejandra Guerrero Rodriguez (2072) but lost concentration for a second and allowed her opponent to force a rook trade into a lost king and pawn ending. Both the bottom two boards were drawn but in truth could and probably should have been defeats for the Scottish players, but they have to be credited for putting up enough resistance to frustrate their opponents.

Ireland will be slightly disappointed as they could only manage a 2-2 draw with Yemen.Wales were also heavily outrated by Italy and lost 3½-½.

Women Standings

Rank Country Match Points Deducted SB
1 Russia 10 89
2 China 9 85.5
3 Serbia 9 75.5
4 Poland 9 75.5
5 Slovakia 9 68
6 Ukraine 8 76
7 Hungary 8 75.5
8 Georgia 8 74
76 England 4 29
83 Scotland 4 23
88 Wales 4 19
97 Ireland 3 22

Full Round 5 Standings


Features editor for the Yorkshire Chess website. I collate and write atricles about all the latest chess activities in Yorkshire and beyond. I've also been known to shove some pieces myself from time to time!

Advertisement

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. 2012 Chess Olympiad - Round 10 - Yorkshire Chess - February 25, 2013

    […]   Round 1     Round 2     Round 3     Round 4     Round 5     Round 6     Round 7     Round 8     Round 9   […]

  2. 2012 Chess Olympiad - Preview - Yorkshire Chess - February 26, 2013

    […] 1     Round 2     Round 3     Round 4     Round 5     Round 6     Round 7     Round 8     Round 9   […]

Leave a Reply