2012 Chess Olympiad – Round 6

2012 Chess Olympiad – Round 6

Istanbul-2012

For further reports and coverage of the Olympiad, we highly recommend visiting the following websites:

ChessBase News – high quality reports with grandmaster analysis of games.
TWIC – Live updates and thorough results

Rupert Jones will be continuing his blog on his time at Istanbul – you can see all his posts and more exciting articles, including historical Olympiad encounters at www.fantasychessteam.com.

Links to Previous Reports

Preview     Round 1     Round 2     Round 3     Round 4     Round 5    

Rupert Jones’ Blog – The PGN Files

Part 1     Part 2     Part 3     Part 4     Part 5     Part 6     Part 7    

IM Christof Sielecki also known as @Chess Explained will be providing excellent daily commentary of the best games of the Olympiad:

Round 1     Round 2     Round 3     Round 4     Round 5    

Open

Clicking on the match header will reveal the individual board results.

Board 1: Russia 2 - 2 Armenia


Russia 2 – 2 Armenia
Vladimir Kramnik (2797) 1 – 0 Levon Aronian (2816)
Alexander Grischuk (2763) 0 – 1 Sergei Movsesian (2698)
Sergey Karjakin (2785) ½ – ½ Vladimir Akopian (2687)
Dmitry Jakovenko (2722) ½ – ½ Gabriel Sargissian (2693)

Board 2: Azerbaijan 3 - 1 Croatia


Azerbaijan 3 – 1 Croatia
Teimour Radjabov (2788) 1 – 0 Ivan Saric (2638)
Eltaj Safarli (2620) ½ – ½ Mladen Palac (2599)
Shakhriyar Mamedyarov (2729) 1 – 0 Ante Brkic (2587)
Rauf Mamedov (2634) ½ – ½ Zdenko Kozul (2616)

Board 3: Germany 2 - 2 USA

Germany 2 – 2 USA
Arkadij Naiditsch (2712) ½ – ½ Hikaru Nakamura (2778)
Igor Khenkin (2656) ½ – ½ Gata Kamsky (2746)
Georg Meier (2648) ½ – ½ Alexander Onischuk (2666)
Daniel Fridman (2653) ½ – ½ Varuzhan Akobian (2617)

Board 4: Czech Republic 1½ - 2½ Spain

Czech Republic 1½ – 2½ Spain
Viktor Laznicka (2683) 0 – 1 Francisco Vallejo Pons (2697)
David Navara (2691) 1 – 0 Ivan Salgado Lopez (2638)
Vlastimil Babula (2595) ½ – ½ Miguel Illescas Cordoba (2601)
Jiri Stocek (2569) 0 – 1 Manuel Perez Candelario (2575)

Board 5: Phillipines 2½ - 1½ Bulgaria

Phillipines 2½ – 1½ Bulgaria
Wesley So (2652) ½ – ½ Veselin Topalov (2752)
Oliver Barbosa (2554) 1 – 0 Kiril Georgiev (2682)
Eugene Torre (2469) ½ – ½ Ivan Cheparinov (2681)
Mark Paragua (2508) ½ – ½ Alexander Delchev (2596)

Board 6: Bosnia & Herzegovina ½ - 3½ China

Bosnia & Herzegovina ½ – 3½ China
Bojan Kurajica (2551) ½ – ½ Wang Hao (2726)
Emir Dizdarevic (2499) 0 – 1 Wang Yue (2685)
Dalibor Stojanovic (2495) 0 – 1 Ding Liren (2695)
Denis Kadric (2418) 0 – 1 Li Chao (2665)

Board 7: Hungary 3 - 1 Poland

Hungary 3 – 1 Poland
Peter Leko (2737) ½ – ½ Radoslaw Wojtaszek (2717)
Zoltan Almasi (2713) 1 – 0 Mateusz Bartel (2654)
Judit Polgar (2698) 1 – 0 Dariusz Swiercz (2594)
Ferenc Berkes (2685) ½ – ½ Bartlomiej Macieja (2594)

Board 8: England 2 - 2 Italy

England 2 – 2 Italy
Michael Adams (2722) ½ – ½ Fabiano Caruana (2773)
Gawain Jones (2653) 0 – 1 Michele Godena (2516)
Nigel Short (2698) 1 – 0 Sabino Brunello (2586)
David Howell (2635) ½ – ½ Daniyyl Dvirnyy (2520)

Board 9: Montenegro 1 - 3 Ukraine

Montenegro 1 – 3 Ukraine
Nikola Djukic (2523) ½ – ½ Vasily Ivanchuk (2769)
Dragisa Blagojevic (2510) ½ – ½ Ruslan Ponomariov (2734)
Dragan Kosic (2526) 0 – 1 Pavel Eljanov (2693)
Blazo Kalezic (2438) 0 – 1 Alexander Moiseenko (2706)

Board 10: India 2 - 2 Israel

India 2 – 2 Israel
Krishnan Sasikiran (2707) ½ – ½ Boris Gelfand (2738)
Pentala Harikrishna (2685) ½ – ½ Emil Sutovsky (2687)
Parimarjan Negi (2664) 1 – 0 Maxim Rodshtein (2642)
Abhijeet Gupta (2637) 0 – 1 Boris Avrukh (2605)

The last fixture of this year’s Olympiad involving both teams on 100% took place today in the potentially decisive encounter between Russia and Armenia. Russia chose to select their top three boards and have their reserve player, Dmitry Jakovenko (2722) to play board 4 as he has started the tournament on a perfect 4/4. Armenia selected their designated top four boards.

The top board encounter between two members of the 2800 club, Vladimir Kramnik (2797) and Levon Aronian (2816) began life as an exchange Slav which is stereotypically pretty drawish. Kramnik had different ideas. He quickly built up a lot of pressure on the queenside and sacrificed a piece to get two queenside passed pawns and open lines for his heavy pieces. After a couple of innacuracies from Aronian, the combination of threats to win the piece back in combination with the tearaway passed pawns forced Aronian’s resignation after 35 moves to give Russia a crucial 1-0 lead. Board 3 was next to finish as neither Sergey Karjakin (2785) nor Vladimir Akopian (2687) wanted to risk things and played out a repetition in a tense position, leaving Russia only needing one point from their two black boards.

The game on Board 4 between Jakovenko and Gabriel Sargissian (2693) began as a Queen’s Gambit Declined and quickly liquidated into a double rook endgame with both sides having 5 pawns each. Sargissian playing White had a nagging advantage all the way through with extra activity. However Jakovenko proved the maxim that all rook and pawn endings are drawn to be drew and the match hung on the result between Alexander Grischuk (2763) and Sergei Movsesian (2698) on board 2. The game started life as an English opening but quickly went into a Benoni-type structure. Movsesian playing White seemed to be more at home and Grischuk started lashing out on the kingside, leaving Movsesian to control the centre. In a terribly complicated position, before the time control Grischuk sacrificed an exchange to try and break up White’s central domination. This worked, but his king was simply too big a target and Movsesian’s greater forces created mating threats all the way to the endgame until Grischuk finally resigned in the face of an inevitable checkmate. Armenia will be the much happier of the two sides after the 2-2 draw, although this result has allowed some of the other nations to get back into the fight.

Azerbaijan got off to a good start against lower-rated Croatia as they got two quick draws with black, leaving Teimour Radjabov (2788) and Shak Mamedyarov (2729) to get the remaining 1½ points with the white pieces and they both delivered. Radjabov was always in control of his game, whilst Mamedyarov played a typically unbalanced game in which he sacrificed his queen for a rook and piece. Whilst this might have not been objectively sound, he continued with the complications and eventually broke through to guide Azerbaijan to a 3-1 victory.

England had on paper their easiest match of the last few rounds as they faced Italy, who they heavily outrated on the bottom three boards. The match started off with two logical draws by Michael Adams (2722) and David Howell (2635). Gawain Jones (2653) has been struggling for form as although he has remained undefeated, he has frequently been defending miserable positions. Today his resistance finally broke as he miscalculated in the tactics and allowed Michele Godena (2516) to win an exchange and Godena never allowed Jones back into the game. England’s stalwart, Nigel Short (2698) was once again there to save the day for England and guide them to their third consecutive 2-2 draw. He was involved in a position seemingly without much life but the bishops of opposite colour allowed him to keep creating little threats and have an annoying initiative. Ultimately Sabino Brunello (2586) lost concentration and allowed Short to fork his rook and mate so he had to immediately resign. England seem to have a really good team fighting spirit, led by Michael Adams’ solid perfomances on board 1 and Nigel Short’s persistance on board 3.

USA continued where they left off before the rest day with four draws against Germany. There was some entertaining chess in the match between Czech Republic and Spain. The results on the top three boards largely went with rating, but the decisive result of this match came on board 4 as Manuel Perez Candelario (2575) squashed his opponent to the side of the board and eventually broke through with a decisive attack to give Spain a 2½-1½ victory.

The Phillipines are to be underestimated at your peril, they pulled off a shock 2½-1½ win over Bulgaria. Admittedly, they needed a huge slice of luck. Wesley So (2652) held Veselin Topalov (2752) on board 1 but the real drama happened on board 2. Kiril Georgiev (2682) had a queen and a pawn for two rooks in an endgame but had a huge attack and a dangerous passed pawn and was probably simply winning against Oliver Barbosa (2554). However Barbosa hung in there until Georgiev inexplicably allowed a short combination which resulted in the loss of his queen and he immediately resigned. Heartbreak for Bulgaria but the Philippines are now only one match point behind the leaders past the halfway stage.

Judit Polgar (2698) gave Hungary the lead in their match against Poland in a typically wild and complicated Dragodorf which was added to a win by Zoltan Almasi (2713) to give Hungary a 3-1 win. Ukraine eased to a 3-1 win over surprise package Montenegro. China pulled off a dominant win over a decent Bosnia & Herzegovina side.

Open Home Nations

Clicking on the match header will reveal the individual board results.

Board 77: IBCA 3½ - ½ Ireland

IBCA 3½ – ½ Ireland
Yuri A Meshkov (2390) ½ – ½ Alex Astaneh Lopez (2398)
Pjotr Dukaczewski (2228) 1 – 0 Ryan Rhys Griffiths (2362)
Oliver Christian Mueller (2265) 1 – 0 Gavin Wall (2338)
Christopher Ross (2231) 1 – 0 Daire McMahon (2153)

Board 33: Scotland ½ - 3½ Sweden

Scotland ½ – 3½ Sweden
Colin McNab (2446) 0 – 1 Nils Grandelius (2562)
Ketevan Arakhamia-Grant (2421) 0 – 1 Hans Tikkanen (2570)
John Shaw (2424) ½ – ½ Emanuel Berg (2576)
Alan Tate (2332) 0 – 1 Axel Smith (2503)

Board 46: Japan 3 - 1 Wales

Japan 3 – 1 Wales
Shinya Kojima (2282) ½ – ½ Richard Jones (2393)
Ryosuke Nanjo (2316) 1 – 0 Tim Kett (2237)
Akira Watanabe (2278) ½ – ½ Richard Dineley (2259)
Alexander Averbukh (2211) 1 – 0 Thomas Brown (2104)

Board 70: Kenya 4 - 0 Jersey

Kenya 4 – 0 Jersey
Joseph Atwoli (2065) 1 – 0 Alan Rosenbeiger (2151)
Martin Gateri (2082) 1 – 0 Tito Khan (2049)
Githiniji Hinga (N/A) 1 – 0 Louis Jouhault (1966)
Benjamin Magana (2032) 1 – 0 Paul Wojciechowski (2068)

Board 71: Mauritania 2 - 2 Guernsey

Mauritania 2 – 2 Guernsey
Sidi Mbarcek Mohamed (1947) 0 – 1 Fred Hamperl (2120)
Ahmed Taleb Mohamed (1965) 0 – 1 Peter Rowe (1987)
Sidi Boydia (2024) 1 – 0 Toby Brookfield (1823)
Mohamed Salem Yahi (1895) 1 – 0 Timothy Knight (1821)

Ireland would have been looking to continue their fine form exhibitied in their last match against Israel as they faced the International Braille Chess Association. However unfortunately they were thoroughly outplayed by their opponents and they never had a look in as they eventually lost the match 3½-½. Chris Ross (2231) continued his fine form for the IBCA with yet another victory.

John Shaw (2424) got Scotland off to a decent start against Sweden as he managed to earn a quick draw with Emanuel Berg (2576). However the rating difference eventually told and Sweden won the match 3½-½. Wales will be disappointed with the manner of their 3-1 defeat against Japan.

I don’t know if Kenya are massively underrated or not, but they certainly showed Jersey a clean pair of heels today despite being underrated on paper. Guernsey moved into first place in the Channel Islands Olympiad as they copied Jersey and drew 2-2 with Mauritania.

Open Standings

Rank Country Match Points Deducted SB
1 Russia 12 121
2 Armenia 11 118
3 Azerbaijan 11 107
4 China 10 119
5 Phillippines 10 108
6 Ukraine 10 105
7 Hungary 10 105
8 Spain 10 92.5
14 England 9 95.5
67 Ireland 6 65
99 Scotland 5 42.5
124 Wales 4 24.5
144 Guernsey 3 17.5
149 Jersey 2 16

Full Round 6 Standings

Women

Clicking on the match header will reveal the individual board results.

Board 1: China 2 - 2 Russia

< China 2 – 2 Russia
Hou Yifan (2599) 1 – 0 Tatiana Kosintseva (2530)
Zhao Xue (2549) 0 – 1 Nadezhda Kosintseva (2524)
Ju Wenjun (2528) ½ – ½ Alexandra Kosteniuk (2489)
Huang Qian (2447) ½ – ½ Natalia Pogonina (2448)

Board 2: Poland 3½ - ½ Serbia

Poland 3½ – ½ Serbia
Monika Socko (2467) 1 – 0 Natasa Bojkovic (2392)
Iweta Rajlich (2412) 1 – 0 Maria Manakova (2304)
Jolanta Zawadzka (2377) ½ – ½ Andjelija Stojanovic (2277)
Karina Szczepkowska (2375) 1 – 0 Ana Benderac (2266))

Board 3: Slovakia 1½ - 2½ Georgia

<Slovakia 1½ – 2½ Georgia
Zuzana Borosova (2280) ½ – ½ Nana Dzagnidze (2547)
Regina Pokorna (2353) 0 – 1 Bela Khotenashvili (2500)
Julia Kochetkova (2305) 0 – 1 Nino Khurtsidze (2456)
Alena Mrvova (2241) 1 – 0 Nino Batsiashvili (2432)

Board 4: Hungary 2 - 2 Spain

Hungary 2 – 2 Spain
Hoang Thanh Trang (2464) 1 – 0 Ana Matnadze (2422)
Ticia Gara (2385) ½ – ½ Olga Alexandrova (2417)
Anita Gara (2306) 0 – 1 Monica Calzetta Ruiz (2276)
Petra Papp (2302) ½ – ½ Yudania Hernandez Estevez (2252)

Board 5: Ukraine 3½ - ½ Azerbaijan

Ukraine 3½ – ½ Azerbaijan
Kateryna Lahno (2542) 1 – 0 Zeynab Mamedyarova (2285)
Maria Muzychuk (2466) ½ – ½ Gular Mamadova (2324)
Natalia Zhukova (2442) 1 – 0 Turkan Mamedyarova (2285)
Anna Ushenina (2433) 1 – 0 Khayala Isangadarova (2205)

Russia’s women today faced what will probably be their most difficult match of the entire Olympiad as they took on a very strong Chinese team, featuring World Champion Hou Yifan (2599). Hou Yifan has a combative style, much like that of the best female player of all time, Judit Polgar. This was in full evidence today as she did not shirk the challenge of Tatiana Kosintseva’s (2530) Marshall Gambit and just grabbed all the Russian’s pawns and forced Kosintseva to prove her compensation. The Russian could not mate Hou and could not save the endgame being a pawn down so the first decisive result went to China.

Earlier, the board 4 clash between Huang Qian (2449) and Natalia Pogonina (2448) liquidated to a bishops of opposite colour ending and was drawn. Russia hit back in the clash on Board 2. Nadezhda Kosintseva (2524) took advantage of the many holes in Zhao Xue’s (2549) position to win a piece and later the game, which equalised the scores at 1½-1½. Ju Wenjun (2528) tried to win her slightly better endgame against former World Champion Alexandra Kosteniuk (2489) but Kosteniuk sacrificed a pawn for activity and this made holding the draw quite trivial. Russia will be thankful that they didn’t lose and China’s fate is now out of their hands as they need Russia to slip up in order to have any chance of winning the gold medal.

Poland scored a dominant victory over Serbia and cannot be underestimated as they have been playing very strong chess all tournament. Georgia, Ukraine, France, Vietnam, Armenia and USA all had comfortable victories.

India put a further blow to Germany’s tournament by defeating them 3-1 while Peru pulled off an amazing victory over Latvia highlighted by Vanessa Zambrano Sanchez’s (1858) win over Katrina Skinke (2226).

Women Home Nations

Clicking on the match header will reveal the individual board results.

Board 39: Scotland 2 - 2 Jordan

Scotland 2 – 2 Jordan
Heather Lang (2015) 1 – 0 Razana Al Shaeby (1687)
Ali Roy (1836) ½ – ½ Natalie Fuad (1997)
Rosemary Giulian (1894) ½ – ½ Boshra Al Saheby (1927)
Alice Lampard (1593) 0 – 1 Ghayad M Alattar (1921)

Board 41: Qatar 0 - 4 England

Qatar 0 – 4 England
Ghada Al-Khulaifi (1646) 0 – 1 Maria Yurenok (2058)
Fatima A Al-Khulaifi (1583) 0 – 1 Sarah Hegarty (2120)
Alshaymaa Safar (1575) 0 – 1 Sabrina Chevannes (2090)
Kholoud Al-Khelaifi (1498) 0 – 1 Kanwal Bhatia (2103)

Board 45: Wales 2 - 2 Uruguay

Wales 3½ – ½ Uruguay
Olivia Smith (2022) 0 – 1 Camila Colombo (2095)
Susan Blackburn (1967) 1 – 0 Natalia Silva (1918)
Lynda Roberts (1914) 0 – 1 Patricia De Leon (1841)
Alyssa Wang (1541) 1 – 0 Anaclara Costa (1673)

Board 49: Ireland 1 - 3 Lebanon

Ireland 1 – 3 Lebanon
Hannah Lowry O’Reilly (1818) 0 – 1 Maya Jalloul (1923)
Gearoidin O’Liaghleis (1894) 0 – 1 Youmna Makhlouf (1950)
Karina Kruk (N/A) 0 – 1 Sara Shamieh (N/A)
Sarah Jane Hearne (1565) 1 – 0 Farah Qasqas (N/A)

England continued their strong resurgence in form with a heavy win over Qatar. Jordan have taken the opportunity to be flexible with their board order to the extreme as they seem to be using their top board as a sacrificial lamb to try and secure wins on the lower boards. This strategy seemed to work against Scotland as a 2-2 draw was played out.

Wales will be satisfied with their 2-2 draw against Uruguay but Ireland sadly lost 3-1 to the Lebanon.

Women Standings

Rank Country Match Points Deducted SB
1 Russia 11 121
2 Poland 11 119
3 China 10 126.5
4 Ukraine 10 120
5 Georgia 10 116.5
6 France 10 103.5
7 Vietnam 10 88.5
54 England 6 56
81 Wales 5 34
82 Scotland 5 34
111 Ireland 3 27

Full Round 6 Standings


Features editor for the Yorkshire Chess website. I collate and write atricles about all the latest chess activities in Yorkshire and beyond. I've also been known to shove some pieces myself from time to time!

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